fbpx
was successfully added to your cart.

Cart

Monthly Archives

December 2017

December Birthstone Part 4

Lapiz Lazuli

The beautiful blues in paintings from the Renaissance are thanks to the blue of lapislapislazuli
lazuli, the opaque blue gem material that was the secret ingredient in ultramarine, the
valuable pigment that all the old masters used to capture the rich blues of the sea
and sky and the robes of the Virgin Mary. The color wasn’t duplicated by any other
substance until 1834 but even now, some argue there is no substitute: unlike other
pigments ultramarine centuries old still glows with rich color today.

As befits a gem that has been international currency for millennia, the name lapis
lazuli is mélange of languages. From the Latin, lapis means stone. From the Arabic,
azul means blue.

Lapis lazuli is still mined at the deposits of the ancient world in Afghanistan. Today
lapis lazuli is also mined in Chile. Small quantities are also produced in Siberia, in
Colorado in the United States, and in Myanmar.

Lapis lazuli is somewhat porous and should be protected from chemicals and solvents. Lapis is not very hard, and should be protected from other jewelry when stored to avoid scratches. Clean with mild dish soap: use a toothbrush to scrub behind the stone where dust can collect.

December Birthstone Part 3

Turquoise

Turquoise is among the oldest known gemstones- it has been mined since 3,200 BC.turquoise
It graced the necks of Egyptian Pharaohs and adorned the ceremonial dress of early
Native Americans. This robin egg blue hued gemstone has been attributed with
healing powers, promoting the wearer’s status and wealth, protection from evil and
brings good luck.

Turquoise is an opaque, light to dark blue or blue-green gem. The finest color is an
intense blue. Turquoise may contain narrow veins of other materials either isolated or
as a network. They are usually black, brown, or yellowish-brown in color. Known as
the matrix, these veins of color are sometimes in the form of an intricate pattern,
called a spider web.

To improve its color and durability, turquoise is commonly permeated with plastic, a stable enhancement. It is also
sometimes permeated with colorless oil or wax, which is considered not as stable as plastic. Some turquoise is dyed to
improve its color, but rarely, as this is an unstable enhancement.

Special care is required for turquoise regardless of whether or not it is enhanced. A porous gemstone, turquoise can absorb
anything it touches. Avoid contact with cosmetics, perfumes, skin oil, acids, and other chemicals. Avoid dehydrating it or
exposing it to heat.

December Birthstone Part 2

Tanzanite

 

Tanzanite is an exotic, vivid blue, kissed by purple hues. Legend has it that tanzanitetanzanite
was first discovered when some brown gemstone crystals lying on the dry earth were
caught in a fire set by lightning that swept through the grass-covered hills. The Masai
herders driving cattle in the area noticed the beautiful blue color and picked the
crystals up, becoming the first tanzanite collectors.

Tanzanite has the beauty, rarity and durability to rival any gemstone. It is the ultimate
prize of a gemstone safari. Tanzanite is mined only in Tanzania at the feet of the
majestic Mount Kilimanjaro.

One of the most popular blue gemstones available today, tanzanite occurs in a
variety of shapes and sizes and also provides a striking assortment of tonal qualities.
Rarely pure blue, tanzanite almost always display its signature overtones of purple. In
smaller sizes, tanzanite tends toward the lighter tones and the lavender color is more
common. While in larger sizes, tanzanite typically displays deeper, richer color.

Tanzanite is so hot, it was the first gemstone added to the birthstone list since 1912 by the American Gem Trade
Association.

Virtually every tanzanite is heated to permanently change its color from orange-brown to the spectacular violet-blue color for
which this precious gemstone variety is known.

December Birthstone Part 1

December has several accepted birthstones Blue Zircon (not to be confused with Cubic Zirconia, a man-made stone) is one of them.

Blue Zircon

In the middle ages, zircon was said to aid sleep, bring prosperity, and promote honorzircon
and wisdom in its owner. The name probably comes from the Persian word zargun
which means “gold-colored.”

The fiery, brilliance of zircon can rival any gemstone. The affordability of its vibrant
greens, sky blues, and pleasing earth tones contributes to its growing popularity
today.

Zircon is mined in Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, Thailand, and other countries.
Because it can be colorless, green, blue, yellow, brown, orange, dark red, and all the
colors in between, it is a popular gem for connoisseurs who collect different colors or
zircon from different localities.

Zircon jewelry should be stored carefully because although this ancient gem is hard, facets can abrade and chip. Clean with
mild dish soap: use a toothbrush to scrub behind the stone where dust can collect. Better yet, bring all your jewelry in and have it professionally inspected and thoroughly cleaned – for FREE!